Tag Archives: The Man From Snowy River

My Top 5 Favourite Horse Stories

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I’ve just begun writing my next rural romance which features a heroine determined to resurrect the long-defunct local hunt club’s point to point race, albeit with a twist that not everyone approves of.

To help put me in the mood, I’m reading a history of the Mount Gambier Hunt Club, of which I was a once a member. All the adventurous tales and amusing anecdotes, including those of my great-grandfather Lou Hein, grandfather Lloyd aka “Torchy”, and uncle Clarrie, who were also members, got me thinking about my favourite horse books.

So here they are!

1/. The Black Stallion by Walter Farley

The Black Stallion by Walter FarleyI cannot express how passionately I felt as a child about this story of a boy called Alec Ramsay and a stallion simply called the Black, who find themselves washed up on a barren island after a storm wrecks the ship on which they were travelling. Slowly the pair form an unbreakable bond. When they finally make it home, it’s discovered that the Black is one super-fast horse. Soon, he’s pitted against the best in the land in a race that will have you turning those pages at a gallop. Gawd, I get teary just thinking about it.

Seriously, if it was in any way possible, I would have married this book. I loved it and the entire Black Stallion series that much. I also wonder if this was the book that made me want to be a writer. The daydreams I had over it! Certainly it has a very special place in my reading heart.

2/. Riders by Jilly Cooper

Riders by Jilly Cooper. Ah, how can one go past the absolute naughty deliciousness that is Rupert Campbell-Black, Cooper’s much-adored equestrian star and complete bounder? While the story is actually more about Jake Lovell, and his rise in the professional showjumping world, it’s his arch-rival Rupert who looms large. Rupert is truly awful sometimes, but he’s brave, smart, funny, unapologetic, deeply loyal to his friend Billy, and fabulous in bed, and we can’t help but forgive him.

What’s great about this story is that there are more like it, including Rivals, Polo and The Man Who Made Husbands Jealous. Given Cooper writes lovely big fat books, that means hours and hours of reading delight. Wheee!

I always imagined myself writing bonkbusters like this and it was a huge shock to discover my stories turned out nothing like Cooper’s. Ah, well…

3/. French Relations by Fiona Walker

French Relations by Fiona WalkerFrench Relations and its follow-up Well Groomed are very much in the vein of Cooper’s Rutshire Chronicles. There’s lots of posh carrying-on and plenty of laughs, plus lashings of lovely romance. French Relations begins with Tash French heading to her eccentric mother’s Loire chateau for a summer break. On arrival she finds Alexandra has bought her a wholly unsuitable, half-mad stallion to ride. When sexy eventer and Tash’s devastating teenage crush Hugo Beauchamp turns up, he’s conned into giving Tash lessons. But there is more than one eligible male in the chateau, taking Tash’s love life on a rather twisted journey.

Ignore the horrid cover (the original was far better), this is great, addictive fun!

4/. My Friend Flicka by Mary O’Hara

My Friend Flicka by Mary O'HaraLike The Black Stallion, O’Hara’s trilogy had me enchanted as a child. Wyoming sounded like a kind of horse heaven and I wanted to visit so badly.

Once more, this is about love and trust between a boy and his horse. Both of whom kind of end up saving one another.

It’s a beautiful tale and a guaranteed heart-warmer. But if I recall correctly, I think it was the second book in the series, Thunderhead, that I liked most.

 

 

5/. The Man From Snowy River by A.B. ‘Banjo’ Paterson

The Man From Snowy River by AB Banjo Paterson. There was movement at the station, for the word had passed around

That the colt from old Regret had got away,

And had joined the wild bush horses – he was worth a thousand pound,

So all the cracks had gathered to the fray.

Reading or hearing that never fails to send a shiver down my spine, and when discussing horse stories it would be impossible not to include this classic Australian poem. It’s exciting and romantic, set in an iconic location, and features a brave hero and his “small and weedy beast” of a mountain-bred horse, both of whom prove their merits in spectacular fashion. Nothing like an underdog to stir an Aussie heart!

The language is wonderful. The rhythm of Paterson’s poem draws us in and sweeps us along, and it’s hard not to get teary over the drama of it all. A must read.

 

If you’re wondering why I didn’t include Black Beauty, it’s because I never really warmed to that book. I also haven’t included The Silver Brumby because, somehow, I never discovered it. How that tragedy occurred is one of the great mysteries of my life. Equine-obsessed me miss a horse book? Impossible! Yet somehow it happened.

Do you have a favourite horse story or movie? I’d love to hear about it. A horsey girl can never have too many equine tales!

 

 

FRIDAY FEAST with Jennifer Scoullar

Is it me, or has 2013 seen some amazing books hit our shelves, especially with Australian fiction? Half way through the year and they’re still coming. July has some beauties, one of them from my Friday Feast guest today.

It’s my great pleasure to once again host Jennifer Scoullar, whose debut novel Brumby’s Run was a *ahem* runaway success. As in Brumby’s Run, Jennifer’s love for the natural environment is explored deeply in her new release Currawong Creek. I have this book loaded on my e-reader already and I’m looking forward to diving into its pages. I know that not only will I have a cracking story to entertain me, I’ll also learn about a wonderful new part of the Australian landscape. Double bonus!

Take a look at Currawong Creek

 

CURRAWONG CREEK

 

Cover of Currawong Creek by Jennifer ScoullarHeartfelt and passionate rural romance from the bestselling author of Brumby’s Run.

When Brisbane lawyer Clare Mitchell finds herself the unlikely guardian of a small troubled boy, her ordered life is turned upside down. In desperation, she takes Jack to stay at Currawong Creek, her grandfather’s horse stud in the foothills of the beautiful Bunya Mountains.

Being at Currawong takes some getting used to, but it also feels like coming home. Her grandad adores having them there. Jack falls in love with the animals, his misery banished and Clare finds herself falling hard for the kind, handsome local vet.

But trouble is coming, in the form of the Pyramid Mining Company. Trouble that threatens to destroy not only Clare’s newfound happiness, but also the livelihoods of her new neighbours, and the peace and beauty of the land she loves.

 

Tempted? Of course you are! Currawong Creek is available now from from your local book or chain store. You can also purchase online from most excellent 2013 Australian Romance Readers Convention Platinum Sponsor, Booktopia. For ebook lovers, try Kobo, JB Hi-Fi Books, Google Play, Amazon (for Kindle) or iTunes.

And now here’s Jennifer.

 

Eat Your Greens!

 

Thanks so much for having me on Friday Feast again, Cathryn. Your new posts each Friday are a terrible distraction to my writing routine. They always make me feel hungry and I wind up in the kitchen!

Continuing the bush food theme of my last visit, I’d like to talk about a wonderful native spinach substitute. Warrigal Greens. (Botanical Name: Tetragonia tetragonoides) It occurs right along the east coast of Australia and is ridiculously easy to grow, either from seed or cuttings. Just imagine, a delicious drought-proof vegetable that’s high in vitamin C. Once you plant it, you’ll always have it in the garden, and it lives without watering or any Warrigal Greensother care, except for pruning when it escapes its bed. Slugs and snails don’t touch it, and it doesn’t seem to suffer from disease or frost. It’s also a pioneer of bare ground, works well as a ground cover and can be dug in as a green manure. Talk about versatile! You can’t eat it raw though, because of oxalates in the leaves. Blanch the leaves first by  immersing them in boiling water for a few minutes and then refresh in cold water. They’re tasty when steamed lightly and chopped with a little butter, or used in salad. It can be substituted for spinach in all dishes, added to casseroles for example, and vegetable slices.

Captain Cook was the first European to realise the value of Warrigal Greens. He used it as a protection against scurvy in his crew, even pickling the leaves to preserve them for long sea voyages. His famous botanist Joseph Banks took the plant to England where it became briefly popular as a vegetable. Strangely, I can’t find any reports that Warrigal Greens was used as bush tucker by indigenous communities. I’d love to know whether it was ever used as a traditional food. Maybe one of your readers might hold the answer?

Warrigal Greens seeds are available for purchase from Rangeview Seeds.

Recipe for a simple Warrigal Greens and Fetta Filo Pie, that only takes ten minutes to prepare.

 

Warrigal Greens and Fetta Filo Pie

Warrigal Greens and Filo Pie

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of cooked and drained Warragul Greens
  • 3-4 spring onions, chopped
  • 4 free range eggs, lightly beaten
  • 120 g cottage cheese
  • 120 g feta cheese, crumbled or chopped
  • Shake of salt, pepper and nutmeg
  • A little fresh or dried dill
  • Sesame seeds
  • 10 sheets of thawed filo
  • Cooking spray

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees. Spray a baking dish with the cooking spray.

2. In a medium bowl, stir together everything except the filo.

3. Lay one sheet of filo in the baking dish, allowing the edges to hang over the sides of the dish. Spray with cooking spray. Repeat with 4 more sheets of filo, spraying and alternating the direction of each sheet.

4. Spoon mixture on top of the prepared phyllo in the pan.

5. Spray and layer remaining 5 sheets just the same as you did before.

6. Roll edges of dough to form a rim.

7. Spray the top and sprinkle on a few sesame seeds.

8. Bake for 35-45 minutes or until golden brown.

9. Let stand 5-15 minutes before cutting and serving.

Why eat English spinach when you can eat Aussie?

 
Why indeed! And you can bet we taste a whole lot better too.

Thanks, Jennifer, for another fascinating post and delicious sounding recipe. I think the futherest I’ve come with using Australian native ingredients in my cooking, besides macadamia nuts, is using lemon myrtle and wattle seeds. It seems such a shame to not use more when we have such wonderful foods to choose from.

What about all you clever Feasters? Have you used or eaten any of our native ingredients? Crocodile pie, perhaps with bush tomato chutney? Quondong jelly? Wallaby stew? (the mention of which always makes me think of Spur, from the film The Man From Snowy River, and his infamous wallaby stew). For overseas visitors to the blog, do you have your own favourite native food?

If you’d like to learn more about Jennifer and her books, please visit her website. You can also connect via Facebook and Twitter.